Roasted Beet Ketchup Recipe

I’m back from my recent vacation to my hometown (Winnipeg). It had been 4 years since I’ve set foot on Canadian soil, and I had a wonderful time. Because we were specifically visiting for Folklorama, we pretty much ate the entire time. No joke.

Now, I am refreshed, inspired, and ready to go! Expect at LEAST a good handful of ethnic recipes to pop up on this blog over the next while, as I come up with time to develop them.

Today’s recipe is one that was inspired at the Indian pavilion. There was a beet ketchup available for sale, and my husband JUMPED on it. He’s an avid hater of tomatoes. While he’s ok with tomatoes in ketchup, he’d just as soon never have to eat tomatoes of any kind. As he also adores beets in general, the idea was GOLD to him. So, he bought a bottle.

It tasted good, but was very thin and not really ketchup-y. Also, it didn’t really taste like they’d been roasted, and I pictured roasted beets making a better ketchup. So, I developed this recipe this weekend, using my awesome Pickled Beets Recipe for inspiration on the seasoning!

If you like beets, you’ll love this. Even if you like normal ketchup and have no issues with beets, you’ll enjoy this as a fun alternative. It satisfies the “creamy but acidic” thing you want from ketchup, is casual and fun while still being earthy, rich, and fancy. SO good!

Enjoy!

3 lbs small beets
1 small onion, peeled and quartered
4 cloves garlic, peeled
1 1/2 cups vinegar*
1/2 cup water
1/2 cup brown sugar, packed
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp each: mustard powder, celery seed, coriander
Pinch ground cloves
Pinch allspice
Black pepper, to taste

Place beets, onion, and garlic on a large piece of aluminum foil, folding edges up to create a pouch around the beets. Roast at 375 for about 1 hour, or until beets are quite tender.

Allow to cool slightly, then rub the skins off the beets with some paper towels (or your bare hands – expect some staining!).

In a food processor, blitz roasted beets, onion, and garlic together remaining ingredients until smooth. Transfer to a large pot.

Bring ketchup just to a boil, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer for 20 minutes or so, until thickened to desired consistency. Remove from heat, cool to room tempurature before transfering to jars or bottles. Chill.

* I used red wine vinegar, but cider vinegar would also taste wonderful. In a pinch, use regular white vinegar

Interested in Gluten-free cooking and baking? You’ll LOVE Beyond Flour: A Fresh Approach to Gluten-Free Cooking and Baking!

How many times have you come across a gluten-free recipe claiming to be “just as good as the normal version!”, only to wind up with weird textures, aftertastes, etc? Most gluten-free recipes are developed by taking a “normal” recipe, and swapping in a simulated “all purpose” gluten-free flour… whether store bought, or a homemade version. “Beyond Flour” takes a different approach: developing the recipe from scratch. Rather than swapping out the flour for an “all purpose” mix, I use various alternative flours as individual ingredients – skillfully blending flavours, textures, and other properties unique to each flour. Supporting ingredients and different techniques are also utilized to achieve the perfect end goal … not just a “reasonable facsimile”. Order your copy here.

Looking for even MORE fantastic gluten-free recipes? Beyond Flour now has a sequel: Beyond Flour 2: A Fresh Approach to Gluten-Free Cooking and Baking!

Imagine gluten-free foods that are as good – or better! – than their traditional, gluten-filled counterparts. Imagine no longer settling for foods with bizarre after-tastes, gummy consistency, and/or cardboard texture. Imagine graham crackers that taste just like the real thing. Crisp, flaky crackers…without the sandy texture. Hybrid tortillas that: look and act like flour tortillas, with the taste of fresh roasted corn! Imagine chewy, delicious cookies that *everyone* will want to eat! Imagine BAGELS. If you’ve cooked from “Beyond Flour”, you already know that these fantasies can be reality – it’s all in the development of the recipes. Order your copy here.

Tags:

Author:Marie Porter

Marie is an award winning cake artist based in Minnesota's Twin Cities. Known as much for her delicious and diverse flavor menu as for her sugar artistry, Marie's work has graced magazines and blogs around the world. Having baked and designed for brides, celebrities, and even Klingons, Marie was proud to share her wealth of baking knowledge in her two cookbooks: "The Spirited Baker" and “Evil Cake Overlord”. Marie has also authored a book about her experiences surrounding the 2011 Minneapolis tornado: "Twisted: A Minneapolis Tornado Memoir"

7 Responses to “Roasted Beet Ketchup Recipe”

  1. Heather
    August 18, 2014 at 9:57 am #

    This sounds really good. I am going to try this recipe and get back to you on my results. I am going to have to make a few changes as there are a few things I can’t have but have substitutes I can use. All the spices are find – but have issues with sugar and may have to cut back on some of the vinegar. I will post my adaptations and will make this over the weekend. Yep, am aware its Monday – but have a very busy week planned and want to make sure I have time to dedicate to cooking.

    • Phil
      April 1, 2015 at 7:34 am #

      If you cut back on the vinegar you might not end up with ketchup, vinegar is what makes ketchup ketchup. We make this at work and now I am trying to use gold beets to make a mustard.

  2. Claudia
    August 20, 2014 at 3:09 pm #

    So mouth watering! That seems amazing.

  3. Harry
    April 5, 2015 at 3:14 am #

    This sounds good. I love beetroot ketchup. In the UK you can get it in the shops made by a company called Foraging Fox. Not sure if it’s available in the US yet.

    http://www.foragingfox.com

  4. Carl of Greenfield
    July 2, 2015 at 1:16 pm #

    Marie, I’m onto my first harvest of beets right now, both the red beets and the Chioggia beets. A friend came over this morning and while we pickled the red beets, we roasted the Chioggia beets for your roasted beet ketchup — just in time for the Fourth of July, too. I’ve been wanting to add beet ketchup to my beet repertoire. Your recipe is truly something to put on one’s list of reasons to live for. Also using garlic and onions fresh from the ground, the ketchup eagerly awaits my new love for kale chips fresh from the oven. So happy to hear you’re from Canada but live in Minneapolis. I hope you can come out for a visit!

  5. Betty
    September 22, 2015 at 9:03 pm #

    Can you use a hot water bath to can the ketchup? How long will it last in fridge? I substituted scant amount of black strap molasses for the sugar. It’s great!

    • September 23, 2015 at 9:20 am #

      You know, I’m not sure – I haven’t worked out the acid levels on this recipe for canning. I’m guessing it’s not high enough in acid to be safe for canning, though.

Leave a Reply