Canada Day Recipes!

When non-Canadians think about Canadian food, they usually go RIGHT for the poutine… but we actually have a ton of other uniquely Canadian foods, many of which are relatively easy to make at home. You know, even when home-as-a-location is no longer in Canada!

Once I immigrated to the USA, pretty much everything I loved back home – and was no longer able to obtain here – became “comfort food”. No matter how ubiquitous it had been back home, no matter how simple… now it was exotic, heart warming, sanity, saving, etc.

So, with Canada Day just 2 days away – and it being THREE WHOLE YEARS since posting my Canada Day Watermelon Bowl Tutorial!), I figured this would be a good time to post a comprehensive list of the awesome Canadian recipes on my blog so far.

Enjoy!

Alligator Pie

Ok, so as a food, Alligator Pie isn’t really CANADIAN… I’m not sure it’s really a thing anywhere, for that matter… but I created this recipe based off a very famous children’s poem back home, so I’m claiming the recipe as being Canadian!

*****

Back Bacon and Peameal Bacon

Back Bacon and Peameal Bacon start off with the same brining process, but utilize different methods to cook them. One is rolled in cornmeal, sliced, and fried… while the other is smoked. Both are awesome. Proper back bacon like this will wreck you for the stuff they call “Canadian Bacon” in the USA!

*****

Butter Tarts

I have two recipes for Butter Tarts posted… Regular and Gluten-free. I even created a Butter Tart Liqueur recipe!

*****

Clodhoppers

Clodhoppers is a well known candy, that originated with a company in my hometown of Winnipeg. This is my recipe for a homemade version – just as good as the “real” thing!.

*****

Cod Au Gratin

I fell in love with Cod au Gratin while living in Newfoundland for a few years, and it still hits the spot. Easy to make, and this version is Gluten-Free!

*****

Cretons

Cretons is a breakfast meat spread from Quebec. First had it when visiting my family in my early teens – hated it at first, love it as an adult.

*****

Crunchie Bars

Crunchie Bars were one of my favourite candy bars back home – chocolate covered sponge toffee!

*****

French Canadian Pea Soup

Ah, comfort food from my childhood. February was ALL about Festival Du Voyaguer… which, really, was ALL about the French Canadian Pea Soup!

*****

Honey Dill Dipping Sauce

Honey Dill Dip is SUPER popular in my hometown, but not all that well known outside of Winnipeg. Very simple – only 3 ingredients – and goes so well on so many things. Can’t have chicken fingers without it!

*****

Honey Garlic Cooking Sauce

Honey Garlic Cooking Sauce is one of those things I’d never really associated as being Canadian, til moving to the USA. You can get hot wings anywhere here… but no honey garlic wings to be seen! I reverse engineered a popular brand of honey garlic sauce from back home, and it’s easy to make at home. I particularly love meatballs cooked in this sauce.

*****

Nanaimo Bars

Generally regarded as one of our two main “national desserts” (along with Butter Tarts), you may recognize Nanaimo Bars from their place of honour on the cover of “The Spirited Baker”. I have a few recipes for Nanaimo Bars online: Cherry, Mocha, and Pumpkin Spice

*****

Partridgeberry Pie

Partridgeberry Pie is my favourite kind of pie, which I “discovered” while living in Newfoundland. Partridgeberries (AKA “lingonberries”) grow wild in Newfoundland, kind of a cross between a blueberry and a cranberry. SO good!

I also have a recipe for partridgeberry wine.

*****

Poutine

Poutine… such a simple thing, SO impossible to find done right locally. Good thing it’s pretty easy to make at home!

*****

Puffed Wheat Squares

Puffed Wheat Squares are apparently a Canadian Prairies thing – and it’s a snack you could find ANYWHERE, much like (But VERY much superior to, IMHO!) Rice Krispy Treats.

*****

Tiger Tail Ice Cream

Tiger Tail Ice Cream (or “Tiger-Tiger”, depending on the brand name!) was my favourite flavour of ice cream as a kid, though we usually just got it when visiting my aunt in Ottawa. So, kind of a rare treat. It’s orange flavoured ice cream with ribbons of black licorice caramel!

*****

Tourtiere

I LOVE Tourtiere, a French Canadian meat pie. My recipe, here, is for a gluten-free version, but for those not requiring gluten-free, you can substitute your favourite savoury pie crust recipe.

*****

So, Happy Canada Day!

Now, for my annual sharing of Important Canadian Culture 🙂

With 2017 being Canada’s 150th birthday, it’s about time I wrote the Canadian cookbook I’ve been planning for YEARS.

“More than Poutine” will be a Canadian cookbook like no other – written by a Canadian living away, it includes both traditional homecooking recipes, as well as homemade versions of many of the snacks, sauces, convenience foods, and other food items that are hard to come by outside of Canada!

High quality gluten-free versions of most recipes will be included.

The Kickstarter for “More Than Poutine is live, here. Please consider backing, and sharing the campaign with your friends!

How to make Peameal Bacon and Back Bacon

As I’ve mentioned before, one of the annoying things about living away from my homeland is the lack of availability of many of the grocery basics, treats, and general comfort foods of home. For the most part, they’re easy enough to make, once I put my mind to developing a recipe (Tiger Tail Ice Cream, or Honey Garlic Cooking Sauce, for instance!)

Recently, I was disappointed with a purchase of “Canadian bacon” (we don’t call it that – it’s back bacon!). I lamented the lack of availability of not only GOOD back bacon, but also peameal bacon. My husband had never even heard of peameal bacon, and had only ever had “Canadian Bacon” as they sell it here in the USA… anemic, flavourless, very blah ham product. This was a situation that needed to be rectified!

So, I did some research on recipes and techniques, and created a recipe of my own, using the flavours I wanted. I ordered a few necessary items – including Prague Powder, which I’d never even heard of – and then called my husband to let him know that I was taking up a new hobby – curing meat. You know you’ve married well when such a declaration isn’t met with some variation of “WTF? Because we don’t have enough hobbies?”, but with “Awesome! I’ve been meaning to take up smoking meats! We can do both!”!

Anyway, both back bacon and peameal bacon start out the same – soaking in a flavourful brine for a few days – and then veer off in different directions from there:

Peameal Bacon is then rolled in cornmeal (Back in the day it was crushed up dried peas), wrapped, and chilled. It’s then cut into thick slices and fried up as needed, usually served in sandwiches. So far as I can tell, peameal sandwiches are mostly a Toronto thing… I have no idea why. They’re fantastic!

Back Bacon skips the cornmeal, and gets smoked until fully cooked. You can serve it as-is, though it’s usually reheated in some form: fried as part of breakfast or in a sandwich, or thinly sliced and used to make pizza. I promise you, making a pizza with this will wreck you for all other pizzas. I made a spicy Hawaiian one the other day – back bacon, pineapple, thinly sliced jalapenos, and a drizzle of sriracha.. spectacular!

Says Porter: “It has a better texture than the stuff I’ve had – firm but not stringy or chewy. Much better flavor, more character. I definitely see a big difference, and I’m not going back”

While back bacon requires smoking – usually requiring special equipment / technique – peameal bacon is ridiculously easy to make, and requires no special skill or equipment. I was really kicking myself for not having done it sooner!

Homemade Peameal Bacon and Back Bacon Recipe

1 Pork loin, about 4 lbs
12 cups cold water, divided
1 cup maple syrup
1/2 cup pickling salt
2 Tbsp Prague powder #1 cure (I found it on Amazon)
2 Tbsp mustard seeds
2 tsp black peppercorns
4 cloves garlic, pressed
3 whole cloves
2 bay leaves
1 lemon, sliced into wedges

Cut pork loin into 2 approximately equal sized chunks (crosswise, NOT lengthwise!). Trim most of the visible fat, if you’d like. Some people don’t both, I don’t like the extra fat on mine. Set aside (in fridge).

Measure 4 cups of of water into a large pot, add remaining ingredients (aside from rest of water!). Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from heat, add remaining water, stir to combine. Allow to cool to room temperature.

Place one chunk of pork loin in each of 2 gallon sized freezer bags. I like to manually divide the lemon wedges and bay leaves equally between the two bags before pouring half of the brine into each bag. Push out most of the air, seal the bags, and put them in the fridge – I put both bags into a 9 x 12 cake pan, just in case of leakage, etc.

Allow the pork to brine for 5 whole days, turning once daily to ensure the pork loins are completely submerged.

After 5 days, discard brine, and rinse pork loins with cold water. Use paper towels to pat dry.

For Peameal Bacon

Pour a generous amount of yellow cornmeal onto a plate large enough to accommodate the chunk of pork loin. Roll loin in the cornmeal, pressing to form a uniform crust. Wrap tightly in plastic wrap, chill for at least an hour before slicing and frying/grilling… if you can handle the wait! (I was unable to!)


(Excuse the crappy cellphone pic. Hubby was at work, and I was SO excited to try some!)

For Back Bacon

Hot smoke it with your choice of wood chips until it reaches an internal temperature of 145-150 F. I left this completely up to Porter, here’s what he has to say about how he did it. (This was the very first thing he’s ever smoked!):

“First I put it in the propane grill at about 225°F for one hour. Then I transferred it over to the charcoal grill for about 2 1/2 hours. The charcoal grill was about 250°F (that wasn’t intentional, was trying for 225°F). While on the charcoal grill I put on soaked applewood chips about every twenty minutes or so, just a small amount each time. I put the wet chips directly on the coals.”

With 2017 being Canada’s 150th birthday, it’s about time I wrote the Canadian cookbook I’ve been planning for YEARS.

“More than Poutine” will be a Canadian cookbook like no other – written by a Canadian living away, it includes both traditional homecooking recipes, as well as homemade versions of many of the snacks, sauces, convenience foods, and other food items that are hard to come by outside of Canada!

High quality gluten-free versions of most recipes will be included.

The Kickstarter for “More Than Poutine is live, here. Please consider backing, and sharing the campaign with your friends!

Interested in Gluten-free cooking and baking? You’ll LOVE Beyond Flour: A Fresh Approach to Gluten-Free Cooking and Baking!

How many times have you come across a gluten-free recipe claiming to be “just as good as the normal version!”, only to wind up with weird textures, aftertastes, etc? Most gluten-free recipes are developed by taking a “normal” recipe, and swapping in a simulated “all purpose” gluten-free flour… whether store bought, or a homemade version. “Beyond Flour” takes a different approach: developing the recipe from scratch. Rather than swapping out the flour for an “all purpose” mix, I use various alternative flours as individual ingredients – skillfully blending flavours, textures, and other properties unique to each flour. Supporting ingredients and different techniques are also utilized to achieve the perfect end goal … not just a “reasonable facsimile”. Order your copy here.

Looking for even MORE fantastic gluten-free recipes? Beyond Flour now has a sequel: Beyond Flour 2: A Fresh Approach to Gluten-Free Cooking and Baking!

Imagine gluten-free foods that are as good – or better! – than their traditional, gluten-filled counterparts. Imagine no longer settling for foods with bizarre after-tastes, gummy consistency, and/or cardboard texture. Imagine graham crackers that taste just like the real thing. Crisp, flaky crackers…without the sandy texture. Hybrid tortillas that: look and act like flour tortillas, with the taste of fresh roasted corn! Imagine chewy, delicious cookies that *everyone* will want to eat! Imagine BAGELS. If you’ve cooked from “Beyond Flour”, you already know that these fantasies can be reality – it’s all in the development of the recipes. Order your copy here.

Savoury Alligator Pie Recipe

A few weeks ago, my friend Charlotte posted something to the effect of “When I say ‘Alligator Pie’, you say what?” as a Facebook status. To me, the answer was obvious – “If I don’t get some, I think I’m going to die!”.

She ended up getting some weird responses, none seeming to know what she was talking about. I was kind of perplexed – Alligator Pie was SUCH a popular poem / book growing up, how could people not know what she – a fellow Canadian – was talking about? I had assumed the book to be British, on account of the style of artwork I remembered from it … and if it had been crazy popular back home, surely her American friends had heard of it, right?

Well, I guess I should have realized it from the hockey references… but as it turns out, the book is Canadian. I guess that explains the confusion! ANYWAY.

This time of year, I end up obsessed with Alligator meat. It finally cooled down enough for me to attend the Minnesota Renaissance Festival a couple weeks ago, and – in my mind – the alligator sausage there is the absolute best part of fest. (Aside from all my friends that work there, I mean!). Shortly after our day at fest, I happened across some frozen alligator meat in the grocery store, so I picked it up… thinking I’d make some sausage at home.

Well, having “Alligator Pie” stuck in my head, I ended up deciding that I should make some. I knew “Alligator Pie” existed in a few different incarnations as a dessert… some as a green coloured cream pie, others more like a pecan pie, with the nutty surface being representative of alligator skin. However, I had never heard of an ACTUAL alligator pie. As one of the most literal people ever (Seriously, Drax is my spirit animal)… it had to happen.

Because there wasn’t really something pre-existing, I could pretty much do whatever I want! I decided to start with a proper cajun trinity – onion, celery, and green peppers – as a nod to gator meat as a very southern thing. (Says the Canadian, making a pie about a beloeved Canadian poem!). I flavoured it with some of the same seasonings I could taste in the alligator sausage that I loved so much… but only as an accent. I didn’t want it to be a sausage pie, after all. I wanted it to be like the savoury pies I’d grown up with – some meat, some vegetables, a little gravy, and a ton of flavour.

This ended up a huge hit with both my husband and a couple other friends that happened to pop by the night I made it… including The Pink Dalek, who almost didn’t share with her mom! The meat was tender and juicy, and the flavours all worked very well together.

This recipe will work well with your favourite pie crust recipe, or even with store bought crust. Looking for a tasty gluten-free pie crust (the filling is inherently gf!)? You should buy a copy of my book, Beyond Flour – pie crust is only one of the many “as good or better than the gluteny original!” recipes in there.

Enjoy!

Alligator Pie

2 Tbsp butter
1 large onion, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
3 stalks celery, chopped
4 cloves garlic, pressed or finely minced
1 lb alligator meat, cut into small pieces
1 lb pork loin, cut into small pieces
1 tsp dried sage
1/4 dried oregano
Pinch dried thyme
pinch cayenne powder
1/2 cup chicken broth or dry white wine
2 tsp corn starch
Salt and pepper

1 double crust recipe of pie dough, prepared (or store bought)

1 egg, beaten
1 Tbsp water

Preheat oven to 425 F

In a large pan, melt butter. Add onion, peppers, and celery, cook until veggies start to soften. Add garlic, meats, and seasonings, continue cooking until meat is browned. For a finer texture filling (as pictured), I transferred the mixture to my food processor and blitzed it a few times, but this is optional.

Whisk together broth and corn starch until smooth. Add to pan, bring to a boil. Allow to cook until liquid becomes quite thick. Remove from heat, season with salt and pepper to taste.

Divide dough into 2 parts – one slightly bigger than the other. Roll the bigger section out , use it to line a deep-dish pie pan* – carefully working it into the corners. Fill pie pan with alligator filling, spreading it into the bottom edge and mounding it in the center.

Roll out the second part of dough, cover the pie filling. Crimp the edges as desired, poke a couple of slits in the top. If desired, roll any extra dough very thin, cut into shapes, and apply to the crust for decoration. Whisk together egg and water, brush over the entire top of pie.

Whisk the egg together with water, use a pastry brush to coat the entire crust with a thin wash of this glaze. Cut thin strips of aluminum foil, gently wrap over the outside edge of the crust to protect it from burning.

Bake for 30 minutes, remove foil, and continue baking for another 10 minutes, or until crust is golden brown. Serve hot!

* I couldn’t find my deep dish pie pan when actually making the pie, so I used a quiche pan – works just as well!

With 2017 being Canada’s 150th birthday, it’s about time I wrote the Canadian cookbook I’ve been planning for YEARS.

“More than Poutine” will be a Canadian cookbook like no other – written by a Canadian living away, it includes both traditional homecooking recipes, as well as homemade versions of many of the snacks, sauces, convenience foods, and other food items that are hard to come by outside of Canada!

High quality gluten-free versions of most recipes will be included.

The Kickstarter for “More Than Poutine is live, here. Please consider backing, and sharing the campaign with your friends!

Interested in Gluten-free cooking and baking? You’ll LOVE Beyond Flour: A Fresh Approach to Gluten-Free Cooking and Baking!

How many times have you come across a gluten-free recipe claiming to be “just as good as the normal version!”, only to wind up with weird textures, aftertastes, etc? Most gluten-free recipes are developed by taking a “normal” recipe, and swapping in a simulated “all purpose” gluten-free flour… whether store bought, or a homemade version. “Beyond Flour” takes a different approach: developing the recipe from scratch. Rather than swapping out the flour for an “all purpose” mix, I use various alternative flours as individual ingredients – skillfully blending flavours, textures, and other properties unique to each flour. Supporting ingredients and different techniques are also utilized to achieve the perfect end goal … not just a “reasonable facsimile”. Order your copy here.

Looking for even MORE fantastic gluten-free recipes? Beyond Flour now has a sequel: Beyond Flour 2: A Fresh Approach to Gluten-Free Cooking and Baking!

Imagine gluten-free foods that are as good – or better! – than their traditional, gluten-filled counterparts. Imagine no longer settling for foods with bizarre after-tastes, gummy consistency, and/or cardboard texture. Imagine graham crackers that taste just like the real thing. Crisp, flaky crackers…without the sandy texture. Hybrid tortillas that: look and act like flour tortillas, with the taste of fresh roasted corn! Imagine chewy, delicious cookies that *everyone* will want to eat! Imagine BAGELS. If you’ve cooked from “Beyond Flour”, you already know that these fantasies can be reality – it’s all in the development of the recipes. Order your copy here.

Geekery and my Partridgeberry Pie Recipe (AKA Lingonberry Pie)

Apologies for the silence on the blog lately – I’ve been hard at work on my upcoming gluten free cookbook, “Beyond Flour”. It hasn’t left me much time, drive, or inclination to post blogs! Whoops.

This weekend, I was inspired to post something… albeit in a roundabout way. The facts are these:

– Since making my husband’s Thranduil costume, we’ve been on a bit of a Lee Pace kick. TOTALLY fell in love with “Pushing Daisies” – posthumously (hah!) – as well as some of his other work. (There is a “Red Bandit” cosplay in the works..)

– A friend (Who you may recognize as “Legolas” in the movie premiere kiss photo of ours that went sort of viral last month) just completed a “Ned the Piemaker” cosplay last week, complete with “Pie Hole” box.

– This past weekend happened to be the weekend I had scheduled for developing a gluten free pie crust for the book.

– Late last week, I came upon this fan art, which I promptly fell in love with.

– We have 159 digits of Pi tiled into our awesomely geeky kitchen backsplash.

… I’m sure you can see where this is going, if you’ve been following this blog for any real amount of time. You should never underestimate how far I’m willing to run with a crazy idea!

So, at the prompting of another friend, we decided to do a mini shoot with Porter as “Thrandy the Piemaker”. We invited our friend over to join in, because… really. Thranduil, Ned, and pie? Awesome. Bonus: Legolas! I went ahead and made a the most ridiculous twee thing I’ve ever made in my whole life – the frilly apron from the fan art – and baked the pie.

The photos from that shoot turned out amazing – and so did the pie! Let me share a few photos, and the recipe for my partridgeberry pie filling. (The gluten free crust recipe will be in the book!):


(We have almost 50 photos from this shoot posted to my costuming page on Facebook. That album is here. So much ridiculousness.. I LOVE it!)

Remember my “Faux Lingonberry Wine” recipe? I think it’s the first time I mentioned my love of partridgeberries on my blog. LOVE them… and I’ve been missing them as a dessert ingredient for a long time now. It’s been almost 8 years… and this is my favourite kind of pie!

So, I splurged a bit and bought some frozen partridge/lingonberries from a local shop*, and here we are!

Partridgeberry Pie

3 cups Fresh or frozen partridgeberries (about 1 lb)*
1 1/2 cups Granulated sugar
2-3 tsp cornstarch
Zest of one orange
Pinch salt
2 pie crusts. See Uncle Tom’s Pie Crust for recipe!
1 egg, whisked
2 Tbsp granulated sugar

Place berries in a medium saucepan. Whisk together sugar and cornstarch (use 2 tsp for a slightly runnier filling, 3 for a thicker one. We used 3 for the pie pictured!), and add to the berries along with orange zest and salt.

Bring mixture to a boil, stirring frequently. The berries will break down a bit, and the mixture will thicken slightly. Allow to boil for 3 minutes before removing from heat. Allow to cool to room temperature – it will thicken more as it cools.

Preheat oven to 425F

If not using a prepared pie crust, roll your two crusts out to about 1/4″ thick. Line a pie pan with one crust, and cut the other into 1″ strips.

Transfer cooled filling into the pie shell, spreading to cover the bottom of the pie evenly.

Use the strips of pie crust to create a lattice on top. Where this filling is very dark and stains easily, I don’t usually do a properly woven lattice – that involves placing and folding back strips to weave other strips through… and can get pie filling all over the place!

I lay one of the longest strips right across the middle of the pie, vertically. Then I cross it with another of the longest strips, horizontally. The next longest strip gets laid aside the first strip laid, then the next one beside the second strip laid. I alternate directions and sides, working from the longest strips down to the shortest.

Once your lattice is laid, trim the edges of the crust to only slightly longer than the edge of the pie plate. Fold the bottom crust edge over the lattice edge, and pinch well to seal. Use your fingers to crimp/ruffle the edge of the pie.

Carefully brush lattice and crust with whisked egg, and sprinkle with sugar.

Bake pie for 15 minutes at 425 F. Without opening the door, turn the temperature down to 400 and continue to bake for another 15 minutes or so.. until crust is golden.

Serve warm or cold – this pie is especially great with some rich vanilla ice cream on top.

Enjoy!

* If you don’t live somewhere that partridgeberries grow, you can ask around any Scandinavian shops and see if they know where you can find some. Alternatively, they can be purchased frozen online from some specialty retailers, and I’m told that IKEA sells them in their frozen section as well. (I just can’t find anything on their site about it!)

With 2017 being Canada’s 150th birthday, it’s about time I wrote the Canadian cookbook I’ve been planning for YEARS.

“More than Poutine” will be a Canadian cookbook like no other – written by a Canadian living away, it includes both traditional homecooking recipes, as well as homemade versions of many of the snacks, sauces, convenience foods, and other food items that are hard to come by outside of Canada!

High quality gluten-free versions of most recipes will be included.

The Kickstarter for “More Than Poutine is live, here. Please consider backing, and sharing the campaign with your friends!

Butter Tart Liqueur!

A while back, I was craving butter tarts .

That’s nothing new, I’m a Canadian away from home – I’m always craving something that I either can’t get at all, or will have to make myself.

What was new is that I was drinking at the time, (Ok, THAT part isn’t new!)… and got it in my head that “Butter tart” would make a lovely flavour for a liqueur or cocktail. I immediately set about working through some ideas, deciding which way would be best to go.

In the end, doing a custom infused spirit and then turning it into a liqueur made the most sense.

This takes very little in the way of ingredients or effort, and the result will make any butter tart fan – or general Sweet Tooth – very happy!

Also: there is time to make this as a Christmas gift!

Buttertart Liqueur

1 cup dark raisins
2 vanilla beans
3 cups decent quality vodka
2 1/2 cups brown sugar, packed
1/2 cup maple syrup
1/2 cup water

Place raisins in a large, clean jar.

Slice vanilla beans lengthwise, scoop the seeds out. Add beans and seeds to the jar, top with vodka, and shake well. Store in a cool, dark place for about 4-7 days, shaking daily.

After a few days, taste. If the flavour is good and strong (it’ll likely be!), strain out raisins and vanilla, discard.* If you want more flavour, allow it to sit for another week or so, shaking daily.

Combine brown sugar, maple syrup, and water in a pot. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until sugar is fully dissolved. Remove from heat, allow to cool.

Combine infused vodka with maple-brown sugar syrup, stirring or shaking well to combine. Bottle in clean wine or liqueur bottles.

After bottling, you should let it age for about a week in a cool place before drinking it – IF you have that kind of patience! Aging results in a smoother, more mellow flavor.

* Saving a few vodka raisins to place in the liqueur bottle makes for a cute presentation idea.

With 2017 being Canada’s 150th birthday, it’s about time I wrote the Canadian cookbook I’ve been planning for YEARS.

“More than Poutine” will be a Canadian cookbook like no other – written by a Canadian living away, it includes both traditional homecooking recipes, as well as homemade versions of many of the snacks, sauces, convenience foods, and other food items that are hard to come by outside of Canada!

High quality gluten-free versions of most recipes will be included.

The Kickstarter for “More Than Poutine is live, here. Please consider backing, and sharing the campaign with your friends!

Interested in boozy culinary experiments? You’ll LOVE my first cookbook, The Spirited Baker!

Combining liqueurs with more traditional baking ingredients can yield spectacular results.Try Mango Mojito Upside Down Cake, Candy Apple Flan, Jalapeno Beer Peanut Brittle, Lynchburg Lemonade Cupcakes, Pina Colada Rum Cake, Strawberry Daiquiri Chiffon Pie, and so much more.

To further add to your creative possibilities, the first chapter teaches how to infuse spirits to make both basic and cream liqueurs, as well as home made flavor extracts! This book contains over 160 easy to make recipes, with variation suggestions to help create hundreds more! Order your hard copy here, or digital edition here.

Interested in Gluten-free cooking and baking? You’ll LOVE Beyond Flour: A Fresh Approach to Gluten-Free Cooking and Baking!

How many times have you come across a gluten-free recipe claiming to be “just as good as the normal version!”, only to wind up with weird textures, aftertastes, etc? Most gluten-free recipes are developed by taking a “normal” recipe, and swapping in a simulated “all purpose” gluten-free flour… whether store bought, or a homemade version. “Beyond Flour” takes a different approach: developing the recipe from scratch. Rather than swapping out the flour for an “all purpose” mix, I use various alternative flours as individual ingredients – skillfully blending flavours, textures, and other properties unique to each flour. Supporting ingredients and different techniques are also utilized to achieve the perfect end goal … not just a “reasonable facsimile”. Order your copy here.

Looking for even MORE fantastic gluten-free recipes? Beyond Flour now has a sequel: Beyond Flour 2: A Fresh Approach to Gluten-Free Cooking and Baking!

Imagine gluten-free foods that are as good – or better! – than their traditional, gluten-filled counterparts. Imagine no longer settling for foods with bizarre after-tastes, gummy consistency, and/or cardboard texture. Imagine graham crackers that taste just like the real thing. Crisp, flaky crackers…without the sandy texture. Hybrid tortillas that: look and act like flour tortillas, with the taste of fresh roasted corn! Imagine chewy, delicious cookies that *everyone* will want to eat! Imagine BAGELS. If you’ve cooked from “Beyond Flour”, you already know that these fantasies can be reality – it’s all in the development of the recipes. Order your copy here.

Canadian Food Experience Project: Newfoundland Partridgeberry Wine Recipe

A month ago, I joined the Canadian Food Experience Project, writing about my memories of a uniquely Canadian food experience.

The Canadian Food Experience Project began on June 7 2013. Per the project:

“As we share our collective stories across the vastness of our Canadian landscape through our regional food experiences, we hope to bring global clarity to our Canadian culinary identity through the cadence of our concerted Canadian voice. Please join us.”

This month’s topic is “A Regional Canadian Food”.

My mind immediately went to the years I spent living in Newfoundland. Newfoundland has a unique culture – even within the Atlantic Canadian provinces alone! – and that really comes through in their food. I was spoiled on some of the best seafood ANYWHERE, and was always trying new things.. rabbit stew. Flipper pie. Every manner of deep fried seafood imaginable. Unique preparations of fish and shellfish, and the most wonderful game meats.


St. John’s … this was home!

I love moose stew, and I’m proud to say that I make the most insanely amazing moose stew ever. Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to get my hands on any moose in the past 7 years… and I’d be afraid to admit to just what depravity I’d agree to, just to get some at this point!

Part of what makes my moose stew insane is the inclusion of partridgeberry wine – a unique wine that is locally produced and readily available in Newfoundland. The tart, bright flavours of the wine work so beautifully with the gamey flavor of the meat… oh, it’s a work of art. I really, really need to get some moose meat soon. (Sorry, I mean.. “Gotta get me moose, b’y!”).


Yum. These guys are EVERYWHERE, back home. So tasty.

ANYWAY.

Partridgeberries are indigenous to Newfoundland, as well as Scandinavia. They’re tart little red berries that taste like a cross between a cranberry and a blueberry… you may know them as “lingonberries”, if you’re a fan of IKEA!

They are one of a few amazing berries that grow wild in Newfoundland, and they’re very popular in Newfoundland cuisine, appearing in jams, sauces, in candies, on cheesecake… and in wine. You can buy partridgeberry wine in local wine stores back home, as there are several Newfoundland wineries that specialize in it.

Unfortunately, you can’t buy partridgeberry wine here in Minnesota, anywhere I’ve seen. Homesick desperation is one of the mothers of invention in my kitchen, and a few years ago I created a recipe for partridgeberry wine. We were able to buy a case of the berries from a local wholesaler!

This makes a very full bodied, gorgeous wine. It’s a fairly sweet wine, with a great mouth feel .. very delicious, and very luxurious. Definitely worth the effort of finding a case of partridgeberries!

If you haven’t attempted making wine before, don’t be intimidated! Check out our primer to home brewing, it starts here, with parts 2 and 3 here and here. Just a small handful of entries, and you’ll be good to go!

Unable to get your hands on partridgeberries? I actually designed a “faux partridgeberry” wine recipe a while back, click here to go there!

Partridgeberry Wine
Makes about 5 gallons

15 pounds frozen partridgeberries
13 pounds granulated sugar
5 gallons water
2.5 teaspoon acid blend
2.5 teaspoon pectic enzyme
1 teaspoon nutrients
5 pounds golden raisins
1.25 teaspoon tannin
1 package Red Star Montrechet wine yeast

Allow the partridgeberries to partially thaw, then coarsely chop them (A food processor comes in handy!).

Place berries and sugar into a large (7+ gallon) pot, stir until well combined. Add water, stir well to dissolve sugar. Heat to ALMOST boiling – stirring constantly – then simmer gently for 10 minutes. Stir in acid blend, enzyme, nutrient, and raisins.

Pour mixture into a freshly sanitized 1.5 gallon fermenting bucket. Cover with sanitized lid and air lock, allow to cool to room temperature (overnight).

The next morning, give the mixture a quick stir with a long, sanitized spoon, and – using sanitized equipment – take a gravity reading. Keep track of the number! (This is an optional step, but will allow you to calculate your final ABV %)

Sprinkle yeast into fermenter, cover with sanitized cover and air lock. Within 48 hours, you should notice fermentation activity – bubbles in the airlock, carbonation and /or swirling in the wine must. This means you’re good to go!

After a week or so, use your sanitized siphon setup to rack the must into a freshly sanitized 6- 6.5 gallon carboy. Put the carboy somewhere cool (not cold!), and leave it alone for a month or so.

Using sanitized equipment, rack the partridgeberry wine off the sediment, into a clean, freshly sanitized 5 or 6 gallon carboy. Cap with sanitized airlock, leave it alone for another 2-3 months.

Rack one more time, leave it for another 3 months or so.

When your wine has been racked a few times and shows NO more fermenting activity for a month or so (no bubbles in the airlock, no more sediment being produced, you can move on to bottling.

Follow the instructions on your selected type of wine stabilizer to stop fermentation. For potassium sorbate, this needs to be done 2-3 days before bottling.

Using sanitized equipment, take a gravity reading, then rack the wine into clean, sanitized bottles. Cork. (We like to use these for corking our homemade wine. Easy to use – no special equipment needed! – easy to uncork, and – should you have any wine left in your bottle after serving (pfft!), the “cork” is easily replaced for temporary storage!).

With 2017 being Canada’s 150th birthday, it’s about time I wrote the Canadian cookbook I’ve been planning for YEARS.

“More than Poutine” will be a Canadian cookbook like no other – written by a Canadian living away, it includes both traditional homecooking recipes, as well as homemade versions of many of the snacks, sauces, convenience foods, and other food items that are hard to come by outside of Canada!

High quality gluten-free versions of most recipes will be included.

The Kickstarter for “More Than Poutine is live, here. Please consider backing, and sharing the campaign with your friends!

Interested in Gluten-free cooking and baking? You’ll LOVE Beyond Flour: A Fresh Approach to Gluten-Free Cooking and Baking!

How many times have you come across a gluten-free recipe claiming to be “just as good as the normal version!”, only to wind up with weird textures, aftertastes, etc? Most gluten-free recipes are developed by taking a “normal” recipe, and swapping in a simulated “all purpose” gluten-free flour… whether store bought, or a homemade version. “Beyond Flour” takes a different approach: developing the recipe from scratch. Rather than swapping out the flour for an “all purpose” mix, I use various alternative flours as individual ingredients – skillfully blending flavours, textures, and other properties unique to each flour. Supporting ingredients and different techniques are also utilized to achieve the perfect end goal … not just a “reasonable facsimile”. Order your copy here.

Looking for even MORE fantastic gluten-free recipes? Beyond Flour now has a sequel: Beyond Flour 2: A Fresh Approach to Gluten-Free Cooking and Baking!

Imagine gluten-free foods that are as good – or better! – than their traditional, gluten-filled counterparts. Imagine no longer settling for foods with bizarre after-tastes, gummy consistency, and/or cardboard texture. Imagine graham crackers that taste just like the real thing. Crisp, flaky crackers…without the sandy texture. Hybrid tortillas that: look and act like flour tortillas, with the taste of fresh roasted corn! Imagine chewy, delicious cookies that *everyone* will want to eat! Imagine BAGELS. If you’ve cooked from “Beyond Flour”, you already know that these fantasies can be reality – it’s all in the development of the recipes. Order your copy here.

The Canadian Food Experience Project – Memories

The other day I was browsing through a few of Twitter’s recommendations for people to follow, and I came upon a fellow Canadian Foodblogger, @Redawna . I clicked through to her blog Nutmeg Disrupted, and was immediately drawn into the first post that showed up – “The Canadian Food Experience Project”.

What a great post! It brought me back to my childhood in Winnipeg, which – like the author’s hometown of Grande Prairie, Alberta – also has a large Ukrainian community. The fact that I’m Irish Canadian (without a drop of Ukrainian in me!) In NO way slowed my access to – or love for – all of the wonderful Ukrainian foods around me. (MMMMm PEROGIES!) More on that in a bit…

I decided to look for more information on this project… partially out of my love for the food of my homeland, and partially because I’m in the throes of a particularly bad bout of homesickness, and I get a bit masochistic when that happens, LOL!

The Canadian Food Experience Project began on June 7 2013. Per the project:

“As we share our collective stories across the vastness of our Canadian landscape through our regional food experiences, we hope to bring global clarity to our Canadian culinary identity through the cadence of our concerted Canadian voice. Please join us.”

Love it… so I did. (Join them, that is!)

This month’s topic is “My First Authentic Canadian Food Memory”.

This was a difficult one for me. They say “you don’t know what you’ve got til it’s gone”, but I’ve been realizing that when it comes to Canadian food… it’s more like “you don’t know what you’ve got til YOU’RE gone”.

So much of what I grew up on, I assumed to be what everyone eats… not necessarily seeing it as particularly Canadian. I never would have guessed that my husband – who was born and raised in Minneapolis, just an 8 hour drive from my hometown – would never have been exposed to much of the staples of our local cuisine in Winnipeg.

So, when it comes to pinpointing my first authentic Canadian food memory, it’s a bit difficult. Is it the Honey Dill Dip that was so ubiquitous in Winnipeg (but was almost unheard of anywhere else in Canada!)? The Cretons I was exposed to when visiting my father in Quebec? The French Canadian Pea Soup that was always a highlight of the Festival Du Voyageur festivities every February?

What about the Tiger Tail Ice Cream that we only ever seemed to be able to get when visiting our great aunt in Ottawa? Maybe the Nanaimo Bars that were always served at the holidays?

I would have to say that – much like Nutmeg Disrupted – my first authentically Canadian food memory was actually Ukrainian!

We spent a lot of time – and pretty much every holiday – at my grandmother’s house. Easter was extra special for me, as my grandmother’s next door neighbour was a sweet little old Ukrainian lady who would ply us with her special Ukrainian Easter Bread. Every year, without fail, she would produce these cylindrical loaves of bread (made in coffee cans). They wouldn’t look like much to someone who wasn’t familiar with them, but we knew better.

Yes, we knew that those plain looking loaves of bread were sweet, tender, moist, and full of citrussy flavor. Really more of a dessert than a bread… and we would plow through it with wild abandon.

A few years ago, I asked my grandmother to get the recipe from Mary. It’s always interesting when you’re trying to get a recipe through a game of telephone – especially when the first two passes are through old ladies 🙂 As is usual with my family, the recipe came as more of a formula – no instructions… and I adapted it a little (increased the flour, increased the zest, changed lard to butter, ditched the coffee can in favor of the traditional decorated style), and figured out what the directions would be.

I prefer this bread served warm, either fresh out of the oven or microwaved. It’s a very tender, moist bread, so be sure to keep it from drying out. Also, it makes a TON of bread, so be prepared to make some friends VERY happy. Also: this makes AMAZING French toast: Add a little vanilla, orange zest, and a splash of OJ to the custard… MMMmmm…

Paska Bread
(Adapted from Mary Morin’s Recipe)

1/2 cup warm water
1 tsp sugar
2 packets active dry yeast (4.5 tsp)
3/4 cup butter, softened
2 cups sugar
8 eggs, beaten
Juice of 1 lemon and 1 orange
Zest of 1-2 lemons and 1-2 oranges
1 tsp salt
1 1/2 cups scalded milk, cooled
~12+ cups all purpose flour, divided
2 egg yolks
1 Tbsp water

Stir sugar into warm water. Sprinkle yeast on top of sugar water, gently incorporate. Allow to sit for 10-15 minutes, until bubbly.

In a stand mixer, cream together butter and sugar until fluffy. Add eggs, continue to cream until well incorporated and fluffy once more.

Add juices, zest, and salt to the mixture, mix until combined. Add scalded milk, continue to mix until well incorporated and smooth. Add 4 cups of flour, combine well. Add yeast mixture, mix until well incorporated.

If you have a dough hook attachment for your mixer, affix it now.

Slowly add remaining flour until a good, coherent bread dough comes together. It should be only very slightly sticky to the touch – not super sticky, and not really DRY.

Turn dough out onto a floured surface, and knead for a few minutes. Dough should be smooth, elastic, and no longer sticky when it’s been kneaded enough.

Put dough into a lightly greased bowl or pot, cover top with plastic wrap, and allow to rise in a warm area until doubled in size, about 1 1/2-2 hours. Once doubled, beat down the middle of the dough and allow to rise another hour.

Now here’s the fun part. Reserve about 1/3 of the dough for decorations, and divide remaining dough out among the pans you’ll be using (grease them first!). For reference, we used a 9″ round pyrex pot, a large loaf pan, and 3 mini loaf pans to bake ONE batch of this. It makes a *LOT* of bread… this is a good thing!

For the main body of your breads, you’ll want the dough to fill about 1/3 of each baking pan – they’ll rise like crazy. Halfway full if you’re adventurous, but don’t say I didn’t warn you. Cover loosely pans and reserved 1/3 dough loosely with plastic wrap and allow to rise another 30 mins.

Once your 30 minutes are up, use the reserved dough to make designs on the top of each loaf. Braids, twists, curls, crosses and rosettes are popular/traditional, but have fun with it. (Google can be a great source of design inspiration.) Toothpicks can be used to help secure designs in place until after baking. Cover loosely with plastic, allow to rise one last time, 30 minutes.

While your dough is rising, whisk together the remaining egg yolks and water to create an egg wash. This glaze will give your finished Paska a shiny, dark brown finish. Beautiful!

Preheat oven to 350°F.

Once final rise is finished, brush entire top of each loaf with egg wash. Bake loaves for 10 minutes. Without opening the oven door, lower the heat to 325°F and continue to bake for another 40 minutes.

Cool Paska for 10-15 minutes (if you can handle the wait), then gently remove from pans and tranfer to a wire rack or wooden cutting board to continue cooling.

I recommend wrapping and hiding a loaf or two, before cutting into any of them. If you’re planning to bring them somewhere, or share with ANYONE, this step is kind of essential.

Cut into one of your warm loaves, slather with butter, and … don’t plan on going anywhere for awhile. It’s easy to plow through a ton of this, and it will give you a bread coma. SO WORTH IT.

This is even great the next day, reheated with butter. Yum.

PS: I am glad that I double checked Mary’s last name for this post. For some reason, I originally typed “Mallon” instead of “Morin”. Mary Mallon. Yes. How’s that for a food blog screw up? Typhoid Fever is the new Truffle Oil?

With 2017 being Canada’s 150th birthday, it’s about time I wrote the Canadian cookbook I’ve been planning for YEARS.

“More than Poutine” will be a Canadian cookbook like no other – written by a Canadian living away, it includes both traditional homecooking recipes, as well as homemade versions of many of the snacks, sauces, convenience foods, and other food items that are hard to come by outside of Canada!

High quality gluten-free versions of most recipes will be included.

The Kickstarter for “More Than Poutine is live, here. Please consider backing, and sharing the campaign with your friends!

Gluten Free Cretons

Cretons – it’s a goofy food name for us Anglos. Look at it, at it looks like someone typoed “Cretin”. It’s actually pronounced something like “Cret-AWN”, and is a hugely popular breakfast food in Quebec.

I first had this when I was in my early teens, visiting my father in Montreal. Hated it! The spiced pork pate looked really gross in the plastic tub it came in, and the idea of putting cinnamon and cloves in a savory Pâté was completely foreign to my barely developed palate.

I think the idea of it managed to confuse my actual taste buds at the time, because – as an adult – I love the stuff. I love spreading meat on toast for breakfast – cretons actually comes second to my all time favorite breakfast: Haggis on a toasted bagel.

Cretons is a lot easier to come by, though. It requires no fancy or hard to find ingredients, and whips up fairly quickly at home. This is my version, which is not only gluten free, but a bit spicier than some of the grocery store cretons I’ve had in Quebec. This makes a good amount for a family, but feel free to cut the recipe in half if needed.

Cretons

2 lbs ground pork
1 large onion, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, pressed
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp ground cloves
1/4 tsp allspice
1/4 tsp ground ginger
2 cups milk
1 bay leaf
1 tsp dried parsley
Salt and pepper, to taste

In a large pan, mash together pork, onion, garlic, and spices. Add milk a little at a time, stirring to create a runny paste. Add bay leaf.

Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until almost all of the milk is absorbed/cooked off. Add parsley, stir well. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Transfer cretons to a storage dish with a lid, as-is.. or put in the food processor and puree for a finer texture. Chill well, stir before serving for the first time.

Store in the fridge for up to a week.

With 2017 being Canada’s 150th birthday, it’s about time I wrote the Canadian cookbook I’ve been planning for YEARS.

“More than Poutine” will be a Canadian cookbook like no other – written by a Canadian living away, it includes both traditional homecooking recipes, as well as homemade versions of many of the snacks, sauces, convenience foods, and other food items that are hard to come by outside of Canada!

High quality gluten-free versions of most recipes will be included.

The Kickstarter for “More Than Poutine is live, here. Please consider backing, and sharing the campaign with your friends!

Interested in Gluten-free cooking and baking? You’ll LOVE Beyond Flour: A Fresh Approach to Gluten-Free Cooking and Baking!

How many times have you come across a gluten-free recipe claiming to be “just as good as the normal version!”, only to wind up with weird textures, aftertastes, etc? Most gluten-free recipes are developed by taking a “normal” recipe, and swapping in a simulated “all purpose” gluten-free flour… whether store bought, or a homemade version. “Beyond Flour” takes a different approach: developing the recipe from scratch. Rather than swapping out the flour for an “all purpose” mix, I use various alternative flours as individual ingredients – skillfully blending flavours, textures, and other properties unique to each flour. Supporting ingredients and different techniques are also utilized to achieve the perfect end goal … not just a “reasonable facsimile”. Order your copy here.

Looking for even MORE fantastic gluten-free recipes? Beyond Flour now has a sequel: Beyond Flour 2: A Fresh Approach to Gluten-Free Cooking and Baking!

Imagine gluten-free foods that are as good – or better! – than their traditional, gluten-filled counterparts. Imagine no longer settling for foods with bizarre after-tastes, gummy consistency, and/or cardboard texture. Imagine graham crackers that taste just like the real thing. Crisp, flaky crackers…without the sandy texture. Hybrid tortillas that: look and act like flour tortillas, with the taste of fresh roasted corn! Imagine chewy, delicious cookies that *everyone* will want to eat! Imagine BAGELS. If you’ve cooked from “Beyond Flour”, you already know that these fantasies can be reality – it’s all in the development of the recipes. Order your copy here.

French Canadian Pea Soup

Ah, pea soup. I love French Canadian style – loved it when I was a kid – especially when served at Festival du Voyageur activities in my hometown!.

I loved it when I first moved out on my own, living on the cheap, and buying the “Habitant” canned stuff like it was going out fo style.

Now, as an expatriate Canadian.. I may love it even more! Unlike many of the other homeland foods I adore, this one is easily made, with almost all of the ingredients being available locally. Sure, you can’t get *proper* summer savory in Minnesota – but you CAN beg friends to bring some back from vacations on Canada’s east coast! (Thank you Laura and Andrew, you’re awesome and I adore you for it!)

This makes a LOT of soup. Because soup isn’t an everyday kind of thing to make, I like to make a large batch, and freeze most of it – it freezes / thaws beautifully.

This version is a bit easier than the 100% traditional way, which uses a ham bone in it. Feel free to add a ham bone in with the water, pulling it out as the mixture gets thick, though. I just find it convenient to use the small, boneless ham chunks for this!

French Canadian Pea Soup

3 onions, chopped
2 cups grated celery
3 lbs dried yellow split peas
24 cups water
3 lbs+ cured ham, cut into bite sized pieces
1 cup grated carrots (about 6 carrots)
1 Tbsp dried summer savory
1 bay leaf
2 tsp pepper
Salt

In a LARGE pot, saute onions and celery, cooking until tender and translucent. Add split peas, water, ham, and carrots, bring to a boil. Cover pot, remove from heat, and allow to sit for one hour.

After one hour, return pot to heat and bring up to a boil once more. Add summer savory, bay leaf, and pepper. Simmer over medium heat until split peas break down, forming a very thick soup.

Season with salt to taste.

With 2017 being Canada’s 150th birthday, it’s about time I wrote the Canadian cookbook I’ve been planning for YEARS.

“More than Poutine” will be a Canadian cookbook like no other – written by a Canadian living away, it includes both traditional homecooking recipes, as well as homemade versions of many of the snacks, sauces, convenience foods, and other food items that are hard to come by outside of Canada!

High quality gluten-free versions of most recipes will be included.

The Kickstarter for “More Than Poutine is live, here. Please consider backing, and sharing the campaign with your friends!

Interested in Gluten-free cooking and baking? You’ll LOVE Beyond Flour: A Fresh Approach to Gluten-Free Cooking and Baking!

How many times have you come across a gluten-free recipe claiming to be “just as good as the normal version!”, only to wind up with weird textures, aftertastes, etc? Most gluten-free recipes are developed by taking a “normal” recipe, and swapping in a simulated “all purpose” gluten-free flour… whether store bought, or a homemade version. “Beyond Flour” takes a different approach: developing the recipe from scratch. Rather than swapping out the flour for an “all purpose” mix, I use various alternative flours as individual ingredients – skillfully blending flavours, textures, and other properties unique to each flour. Supporting ingredients and different techniques are also utilized to achieve the perfect end goal … not just a “reasonable facsimile”. Order your copy here.

Looking for even MORE fantastic gluten-free recipes? Beyond Flour now has a sequel: Beyond Flour 2: A Fresh Approach to Gluten-Free Cooking and Baking!

Imagine gluten-free foods that are as good – or better! – than their traditional, gluten-filled counterparts. Imagine no longer settling for foods with bizarre after-tastes, gummy consistency, and/or cardboard texture. Imagine graham crackers that taste just like the real thing. Crisp, flaky crackers…without the sandy texture. Hybrid tortillas that: look and act like flour tortillas, with the taste of fresh roasted corn! Imagine chewy, delicious cookies that *everyone* will want to eat! Imagine BAGELS. If you’ve cooked from “Beyond Flour”, you already know that these fantasies can be reality – it’s all in the development of the recipes. Order your copy here.

Puffed Wheat Squares

With the new year still fresh on our calendars, you may be looking at finding “healthy” alternatives for desserts and snacking.

Well, this is… almost healthy. (Well, as long as you’re not allergic to wheat, anyway!) The bulk of this bar comes from the puffed wheat, which is very low in calories, anyway. I know, I know… it’sa stretch – but I feel a bit guilty blogging dessert recipes, with all the talk of resolutions out there!

I was feeling homesick and nostalgic lately, and decided to make a batch for my husband. This is actually a super popular bar back home in Winnipeg, and it seems to be mostly a Canadian Prairies thing. You know how you can get Rice Crispy squares pretty much anywhere here, even in the gas stations? It’s the same way with these bars back home. Even just that earthy, roasty aroma of the puffed wheat, as I opened the bag… Mmm. Memories!

These are super quick and easy to make, and are definitely “comfort” food.

Enjoy!


Puffed Wheat Squares

6 oz bag puffed wheat
1/2 cup butter
1 cup corn syrup
1 cup packed brown sugar
2/3 cup cocoa
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp vanilla

Generously grease a 9x 13″ baking pan, set aside. Pour puffed wheat into a large, heatproof mixing bowl.

In a medium saucepan, combine butter, corn syrup, brown sugar, cocoa, and salt. Heat over medium until butter melts.

Once butter melts, turn heat up a bit and bring mixture to a boil. Boil for 2 minutes, then remove from heat and stir in vanilla until well combined.

Pour hot chocolate mixture over puffed wheat, stir (carefully!) until all of the wheat is coated with chocolate. Dump mixture into prepared baking pan.

Using lightly greased (or slightly damp!) hands, firmly press mixture down into the pan, until compacted and relatively flat. Allow to cool completely before cutting into squares.

With 2017 being Canada’s 150th birthday, it’s about time I wrote the Canadian cookbook I’ve been planning for YEARS.

“More than Poutine” will be a Canadian cookbook like no other – written by a Canadian living away, it includes both traditional homecooking recipes, as well as homemade versions of many of the snacks, sauces, convenience foods, and other food items that are hard to come by outside of Canada!

High quality gluten-free versions of most recipes will be included.

The Kickstarter for “More Than Poutine is live, here. Please consider backing, and sharing the campaign with your friends!